Articles

Inscriptions tell tales

T he towering heaps of granite dominate the barren lands on the right side of the road as we speed across Sankarankoil (near Tirunelveli) to reach Tenkasi Road. Several small village god shrines dot the road. One which even has a Tirthankara, now revered as a Hindu sage! The winding road from Subramaniapuram brings us closer to our destination, the village of Darukapuram. A chance epigraph had stimulated my curiosity and the Madhyasthanatha temple's porch, promises more interesting stories....

Primitive mode of communication

Dismissed as scribbles on the wall, the inscriptions on the walls and floors of temples in Tamil Nadu have a precarious existence because they are considered useless by pilgrims and temple authorities. Their only hope for survival are the history and economics teachers in the state but they are the ones who are probably most oblivious to the stories that these ‘scribbles’ tell. Every inscription has a message to us – about a historical, economic, administrative or legal...

A powerful mode of communication

Heritage awareness in schools is slowly picking up with central and south Madras continue to be the focus. North Madras is really where Madras, as we know it today, existed, and it has a temple well worth a one-day field trip which shows on what Madras was like in the mediaeval period. The Siva temple at Tiruvottriyur dedicated to Tyagaraja is the temple within Madras that has the maximum number of inscriptions. Varied topics The quantity of inscriptions is equally matched by variety and...

Useful mode of communication

Heritage awareness in schools is slowly picking up with central and south Madras continue to be the focus. North Madras is really where Madras, as we know it today, existed, and it has a temple well worth a one-day field trip which shows on what Madras was like in the mediaeval period. The Siva temple at Tiruvottriyur dedicated to Tyagaraja is the temple within Madras that has the maximum number of inscriptions. Varied topics The quantity of inscriptions is equally matched by variety and...

Powerful mode of communication

Medieval Tamil Nadu was an agricultural economy. There were many powerful trade guilds and wealthy merchants but even their products were mostly cultivated from the land. Land was therefore the most important source of occupation and symbol of wealth, irrigation – the life blood. The northern part of Tamil Nadu – Kanchi, Madras, and their environs were predominantly irrigated by stagnant water bodies. The Thanjavur area had a network of rivers and canals from the Cauvery river. In...

Writing on the wall

From living rooms to boardrooms, morning walks to late night parties, there is one favourite topic to talk about: elections! Some say that both elections and democracy were a gift to India from the British. Is that true? A study of inscriptions on temple walls reveals that ancient Indians were familiar with the electoral process. Primitive transport and communication facilities and a king always on the move meant that the villages were largely independent of the capital.Local villages were...

Stonespeak: Management then!

In medieval times, due to communication and transport limitations, Tamil Nadu was also a federal system. The King’s focus was primarily security from invasions and collection of taxes. Apart from this everything seemed to be left to the villages to decide. Chingleput and Arcot districts have several inscriptions that testify to village assemblies, which were far more powerful and efficient than their counterparts today. Uttiramerur and Thenneri are two towns that are classic...

Trading, back in time

Inscriptions testify to a well-networked trade and commerce in Tamil Nadu. They not only give insights into economy but also into society and politics. Several trade-related inscriptions indicate how traders sponsored the excavation of stone beds for Jain monks. These are found in many districts, especially in Pudukottai and Madurai. On many of them, the names of the trader and monk are mentioned and also the commodities the trader traded in. Such inscriptions are not unique to Tamil Nadu,...

Trading, back in time

Inscriptions testify to a well-networked trade and commerce in Tamil Nadu. They not only give insights into economy but also into society and politics. Several trade-related inscriptions indicate how traders sponsored the excavation of stone beds for Jain monks. These are found in many districts, especially in Pudukottai and Madurai. On many of them, the names of the trader and monk are mentioned and also the commodities the trader traded in. Such inscriptions are not unique to Tamil Nadu,...

What do epigraphs signify?

(This month’s column focuses on inscriptions and other texts recorded in earlier centuries that many are not aware of.) All major inscriptions and most minor inscriptions of Tamil Nadu have been recorded and published. Do they still exist is an embarrassing question to ask – surely some, if not many, have since been cemented over or broken into pieces. The first volume of inscriptions came out in 1886. Called the Annual Report on epigraphy (ARE) they are published in Mysore and...

Talks

Eroticism in Temples of Tamilnadu


Eroticism in Temples of Tamilnadu
following link : https://youtu.be/6iS-WruwYA4